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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
serious by the moment. when you get the superintendent of scotland yard resigning, the prime minister of great britain going to the well to just basically defend himself and his contacts with him, which were more than any other institution or individual and the country, this is a serious, serious story and reality. >> charles? >> the murdochs were on the defensive and had a lot to defend. i thought their presentation was rather good. i think murdoch -- he runs a company that is unbelievably diverse, and this one paper is a relatively small part of it. i am not surprised, and it is plausible that the committee had a sort of accepted his protestations that he was not aware of all of these shenanigans. what i found really interesting, however, was the way the committee conducted itself. hear, when you have hearings, like the polley north hearings, the inquisitors are on a podium looking down on the defendant there, it was like a british parliament cafeteria meeting. a lot more pointed, less pompous, more effective. >> good review. last word. see you next week. for a transcript of this br
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
and afghan war military families were victimized, too. scotland yard now says up to 4,000 people may have been targeted, in all. investigators are also looking into allegations that "news of the world" paid members of london's metropolitan police for information. the scandal prompted ford motor and a host of other companies to pull their ads from "news of the world." there are political implications too. in an emergency debate yesterday, members of parliament of both parties excoriated murdoch and his newspaper. but prime minister david cameron stopped short of calling for a separate official inquiry. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled about what has happened. murder victims, terrorist victims who have had their phones hacked is quite disgraceful and that is why it is important that there is a full police investigation with all the powers that they need. >> warner: labor leader ed miliband pointedly noted that a former "news of the world" editor had been part of cameron's inner circle. andy coulson was forced to resign as downin
scotland yard's links to the paper stop police probing the phone- hacking scandal more deeply. full disclosure is embarrassing too for the prime minister. a list of engagements released by downing street today show just how frequently he paid court to news corp. executives and they to him. the prime minister won't be saying sorry for that, but rupert murdoch will be apologizing again this weekend for what he called serious wrongdoing at the "news of the world." he's personally signed a letter, which will run as an advert in seven national newspapers so his later in the day, a second top murdoch executive resigned. since 2007, les hinton has been c.e.o. at dow jones and company, publisher of the "wall street journal." but for 12 years, he chaired the company that oversaw the british tabloids now involved in the scandal. he said in a statement today he was ignorant of what apparently happened, but felt it proper to resign. for more on that part of the story, i'm joined now by rem reider of "american journalism review." thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> so tell us a little b
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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